Debunking some myths about Money

When it comes to the subject of money, there’s no denying that many Christians and even churches expressed divided views and adverse attitudes towards it.

It seems that this subject or the biblical relationship we ought to have with money, is mostly and widely misunderstood.

I believe that this misunderstanding or misconceptions arise as a result of us having tainted personal perspectives towards money that are largely shaped and influenced by our different upbringing and environment.

The common misconceptions

Before we uncover more truths related to money and us, let us first address some of the common myths about money that can be found in the Church.

The following are the common myths or misconceptions about money that majority of the Church has:

  • Money is the root of all evil
    God is never against us having more money. He just doesn’t want money to have us and rule our lives. Money is a good servant, but a bad master.

    Whether rich or poor, it will be impossible for us to serve God wholeheartedly when money becomes our master. It is the love for money that is the root of all evil (c.f.
    1 Timothy 6:10).

  • Desiring to be rich or prosperous is sinful
    Our motive for desiring to be rich is the most important factor in receiving God’s intended prosperity upon our lives. It has to be stemmed from a “receive so I can give” motive where we desire to be blessed to be a blessing (c.f. 1 Chronicles 4:10).

    Therefore, desiring to be rich is not a sin. It is our motive that determines if our desire to be rich is sinning against God. Make no mistake that God delights in prospering us. The better financially positioned we’re, the better we’re positioning ourselves to help more people.

  • Being rich makes me less spiritual
    This belief that a true Christian should be poor has been with us for a long time, and it is a deception from the enemy to keep the Church feeble. Without financial resources, much of our efforts to accomplish God’s will are impeded.

    In other words, being poor doesn’t make us more spiritual than if we’re rich. Our spirituality is primarily determined by our obedience to God and not whether we’re rich or poor (c.f. Matthew 6:33).

Money is a spiritual subject

Money is a very spiritual subject. The fact that it actually represents our lives; how we manage and use it does matter to God, makes it an important spiritual subject. And our enemy knows this.

For too long the Church has been deceived where we’re now mostly living in insufficiency, poverty and debt. This has resulted in us being displaced from our rightful position where we’re not fully experiencing His abundance.

Though money or rather prospering financially is just one of the aspects in our development in God, but it is nevertheless a key aspect. And I think this is especially so living in today’s modern world.

Therefore, if we truly desire to live out our fullest potential in advancing His Kingdom, then we need to learn how to adopt a biblical IQ in handling money.

Without it, we can never be a master to money but a slave; constantly susceptible and limited by it.

Passions over ‘prosperity gospel’: Was Jesus wealthy?

It is interesting how the Church has been mostly divided in viewpoints towards money; wealth or prosperity. In the coming weeks, I’ll make an attempt to present a series of entries that aim to put this controversial topic of prosperity in (biblical) perspective. In the meantime, enjoy this article below:


Many Christians see Jesus as the poor, itinerant preacher who had “no place to lay his head.”

But as Christians gather around the globe this year to celebrate the birth of Jesus, another group of Christians are insisting that Jesus’ beginnings weren’t so humble.

They say that Jesus was never poor — and neither should his followers be. Their claim is embedded in the doctrine known as the prosperity gospel, which holds that God rewards the faithful with financial prosperity and spiritual gifts.

The prosperity gospel has attracted plenty of critics. But popular televangelists such as the late Oral Roberts, Kenneth Hagin and, today, Creflo Dollar have built mega-churches and a global audience by equating piety with prosperity.

The prosperity gospel, however, clashes with the traditional depictions of Jesus as poor. That’s because the traditional image of Jesus as destitute is wrong, says the Rev. Tom Brown, senior pastor of the Word of Life Church in El Paso, Texas.

Read the full article here>>>

Power To Get Wealth

Below is a daily devotional message (dated 25 March 2009) taken from Kong Hee’s website on truths about prosperity with a kingdom mentality.

 “And you shall remember the LORD your God, for it is He who gives you power to get wealth, that He may establish His covenant which He swore to your fathers, as it is this day.”

Deuteronomy 8:18

We all know that money can’t buy us happiness, a good name, a happy marriage or lasting friendships. Money certainly can’t buy us eternal salvation or the anointing of the Holy Spirit. But nevertheless, God still wants us to have money-the more the better!

There is a reason why Jesus, for your sakes, became poor that you, through His poverty, might become rich (2 Cor. 8:9). Deuteronomy 8:18 says that He gives you the power to get wealth for the purpose that His covenant with all mankind can be established.

So, the reason why God wants you to have money is so that you can use it to bring the gospel to the whole world. No wonder the psalmist says, “Let the LORD be magnified, who has pleasure in the prosperity of His servant” (Ps. 35:27).

Because the more we prosper financially, the more we can preach the good news and magnify our Lord. There are two contrasting covenants in the Old Testament. One is God’s covenant with Abraham which is eternal, and the other is God’s covenant with Moses which is temporal. Under the Abrahamic covenant, God blesses you to be a blessing to others. God told Abraham, “In you all the families of the earth shall be blessed” (Gen. 12:3).

But under the Mosaic covenant, there is another set of promises found in Deuteronomy 28. It is about God’s favor and blessing for our individual lives. Now, you have to be very careful which covenant you lock your mind onto.

If you focus exclusively on the temporal Mosaic covenant, you could become self-serving and greedy, and end up destroying your life. But if you mature to focus on the eternal Abrahamic covenant, then the more prosperous you are, the more you can be effective for the cause of the kingdom.

The truth is this: you can’t be a blessing if you haven’t been blessed. If you can’t even feed yourself, how are you going to feed the hungry? If you can’t even clothe yourself, how are you going to clothe the naked? If you have no money for your church projects and world missions, how are you going to take the good news to the world?

Meditate on this thought right now: “God has given me the power to get wealth, that I can use it to bring the gospel to the world!”